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iFixit’s iPhone X teardown reveals handset’s stacked logic board, two-cell battery



IT WOULDN’T BE an iPhone launch day without an iFixit teardown, and the California-based repair outfit hasn’t failed to deliver.

iFixit’s teardown of the iPhone X gives us our closest look at the Apple flagship yet and reveals how the firm has completely revamped the internals of its 10th-anniversary iPhone.

The logic board, for starters, is the first double-stacked board inside an iPhone, which means it’s around 70 per cent of the size of that inside the iPhone 8, despite packing in even more connectors and chips. Stacking the logic board allowed Apple to achieve this size reduction, iFixit notes, explaining that the board is essentially folded in half and soldered together during manufacturing.

When unfolded and laid out flat, it’s 35 per cent larger than the logic board inside the iPhone 8. iFixit says the density of components on this board is unprecedented, even trumping the Apple Watch for space efficiency.

This sized-down logic board allows Apple to squeeze in a new L-shaped battery component. This is essentially a two-cell battery, enabling maximum use of the available space. The total capacity of the iPhone X’s battery is slightly larger than the iPhone 8 Plus at 10.35 Wh vs 10.28 Wh.

Related: Thousands sign petition demanding Apple doesn’t open up Face ID to cops



iFixit also gives us a good look at Apple’s reportedly-troublesome Face ID component for the first time (below), which comprises of a food illuminator embedded in the display blasts your face with infrared (IR) light, a front-facing camera for confirming the presence of a face, the IR dot projector and, finally, an IR camera on the left.

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Elsewhere inside the iPhone X, you’ll find Apple’s custom A11 Bionic chip, 3GB of LPDDR4x RAM from SK Hynix, 64GB of flash storage supplied by Toshiba, Qualcomm’s Snapdragon X16 LTE modem, and a Cirrus Logic audio amplifier. 

iFixit gave the iPhone X a so-called repairability score of six out of a possible 10 points, noting that while a crack display should be easy enough to fix, fussy cable ties and the glass chassis means repairs likely will be fiddly and expensive. µ



Source : Inquirer



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